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Investigating the effects on weight gains by shaving the backs of dry stock cattle during the winter housing period. [electronic resource] / David Lydon

By: Lydon, David [author].
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Galway : Galway-Mayo Institute of Technology, 2019Description: 1 online resource (42 pages) : figures, tables.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceSubject(s): Galway-Mayo Institute of Technology (2019) -- Dissertations | Beef cattle -- Feeding and feeds -- Ireland | Beef industry -- Ireland | Farm management -- IrelandOnline resources: eThesis - click to view Dissertation note: BSc (Hons) in Agriculture and Environmental Management Galway-Mayo Institute of Technology, 2019 Summary: The production of raising beef cattle for the consumer market requires that the growth weight of the animals, length of finishing time and the volume of ration and feed required are monitored to achieve weight targets. All these factors are of upmost importance in order to determine the real scale profitability of a beef enterprise. As grass is the cheapest form of feed, the utilisation of this product is extremely important in order to achieve optimum growth rates during the gazing season. The supplementation of concentrates is also a very important element if grass availability is poor due to poor weather conditions. It is of greater importance during the housing period if silage quality is poor and weight gains are not being achieved. This study investigated the overall weight gain, average daily gain and the cost of production of two groups of continental cross heifers over 105 days of the winter housing period. The aim of the study was to investigate if the winter housing technique of shaving the backs of cattle increased the weight gain of cattle compared to non-shaved cattle, it also examined the cost of production per kilogram gained. There was two treatment types used in this study, with one group having their backs shaved and the other group being left unshaved. The two treatments were conducted on 12 spring born 2018 heifer weanlings ranging from seven to eleven months of age which were divided randomly into two groups of six. The daily diet consisted of ad – libitum silage and water along with a barley based ration mix. The study was conducted, over a 15 week (105 day) period, with the weights of the heifers being recorded every three weeks. All heifers under the two treatment types showed a significant difference in weight every three weeks, over the period of the study. There was no significant statistical difference between the weight gain of the two groups or between the two groups over the period of the trial. There was also a significant difference between the two groups of heifers under the two treatments on average daily gain over the period of the trial. There was also a significant difference in the cost of production per kilogram gained between the two groups under the two treatment over the course of the trial.
List(s) this item appears in: Theses: Agriculture and Environmental Management
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eThesis (Browse shelf) Available eThesis - click link above to access eth265155

BSc (Hons) in Agriculture and Environmental Management Galway-Mayo Institute of Technology, 2019

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The production of raising beef cattle for the consumer market requires that the growth weight of the animals, length of finishing time and the volume of ration and feed required are monitored to achieve weight targets. All these factors are of upmost importance in order to determine the real scale profitability of a beef enterprise. As grass is the cheapest form of feed, the utilisation of this product is extremely important in order to achieve optimum growth rates during the gazing season. The supplementation of concentrates is also a very important element if grass availability is poor due to poor weather conditions. It is of greater importance during the housing period if silage quality is poor and weight gains are not being achieved. This study investigated the overall weight gain, average daily gain and the cost of production of two groups of continental cross heifers over 105 days of the winter housing period. The aim of the study was to investigate if the winter housing technique of shaving the backs of cattle increased the weight gain of cattle compared to non-shaved cattle, it also examined the cost of production per kilogram gained.
There was two treatment types used in this study, with one group having their backs shaved and the other group being left unshaved. The two treatments were conducted on 12 spring born 2018 heifer weanlings ranging from seven to eleven months of age which were divided randomly into two groups of six.
The daily diet consisted of ad – libitum silage and water along with a barley based ration mix. The study was conducted, over a 15 week (105 day) period, with the weights of the heifers being recorded every three weeks.
All heifers under the two treatment types showed a significant difference in weight every three weeks, over the period of the study. There was no significant statistical difference between the weight gain of the two groups or between the two groups over the period of the trial. There was also a significant difference between the two groups of heifers under the two treatments on average daily gain over the period of the trial. There was also a significant difference in the cost of production per kilogram gained between the two groups under the two treatment over the course of the trial.

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