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Blood testing of ewes determines the level of life time immunity against the Schmallenberg Virus, with alternative preventions reducing lamb mortality rates [electronic resource] / Tara Esler

By: Tara Esler [author].
Material type: Computer fileComputer filePublisher: Galway : Galway-Mayo Institute of Technology, 2019Description: 1 online resource (37 pages) : figures, tables.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceSubject(s): Galway-Mayo Institute of Technology (2019) -- Dissertations | Sheep -- Diseases | Virus diseasesDissertation note: BSc (Hons) in Agriculture and Environmental Management. Galway-Mayo Institute of Technology, 2019 Summary: Sheep farming is a growing enterprise in Ireland today. Ireland exports a large proportion of sheep meat to Europe and the UK. The topic of this research was to investigate the Schmallenberg virus (SBV) on Irish farms, which was first reported in Germany and was transmitted into Ireland by the midge, Culicoides in October 2012. The aim of this study was to reduce lamb mortality rates on farms due to the occurrences of SBV, with the use of such pour-on products like Spotinor in an effort to prevent the biting midge transmitting the virus. This study also investigated the possible impacts of SBV on all three flocks A, B and C in 2019. We hypothesis that ewes in Flock A, which were previously exposed and infected by the virus would have life time immunity established and antibodies present if re-infected again. The progeny of Flock A, Flock C was visually examined during the lambing season as there are possibilities of these being born with a natural immunity against SBV. A percentage of ewes in Flock A (37%) were blood tested to see if there was a presence of antibodies and were examined during the lambing season. This would aid the investigation to see if ewes previously infected built up their own immunity against SBV or have lifetime immunity. Flock B, the control flock and Flock C were unable to be blood tested. Results from the blood testing of Flock A showed that 21% of lambs from all three flocks lambed with no symptoms of the virus. There is a lower mortality rate on the farm compared to the previous year, resulting in more lambs ready for the market. Finally, we hypothesis that ewes from Flock A had a lower conception rate in 2019 than the conception rates of 2018.
List(s) this item appears in: Theses: Agriculture and Environmental Management
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eThesis (Browse shelf) Available eThesis - click to view eth265170

BSc (Hons) in Agriculture and Environmental Management. Galway-Mayo Institute of Technology, 2019

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Sheep farming is a growing enterprise in Ireland today. Ireland exports a large proportion of sheep meat to Europe and the UK. The topic of this research was to investigate the Schmallenberg virus (SBV) on Irish farms, which was first reported in Germany and was transmitted into Ireland by the midge, Culicoides in October 2012. The aim of this study was to reduce lamb mortality rates on farms due to the occurrences of SBV, with the use of such pour-on products like Spotinor in an effort to prevent the biting midge transmitting the virus. This study also investigated the possible impacts of SBV on all three flocks A, B and C in 2019. We hypothesis that ewes in Flock A, which were previously exposed and infected by the virus would have life time immunity established and antibodies present if re-infected again. The progeny of Flock A, Flock C was visually examined during the lambing season as there are possibilities of these being born with a natural immunity against SBV. A percentage of ewes in Flock A (37%) were blood tested to see if there was a presence of antibodies and were examined during the lambing season. This would aid the investigation to see if ewes previously infected built up their own immunity against SBV or have lifetime immunity. Flock B, the control flock and Flock C were unable to be blood tested. Results from the blood testing of Flock A showed that 21% of
lambs from all three flocks lambed with no symptoms of the virus. There is a lower mortality rate on the farm compared to the previous year, resulting in more lambs ready for the market. Finally, we hypothesis that ewes from Flock A had a lower conception rate in 2019 than the conception rates of 2018.

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